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Pageat Interview Queen

Thanksgiving Advice: 3 things to avoid, 3 things to do

The leaves are changing, the air is crisp, and Turkey Day is fast approaching. Thanksgiving is full of yummy, fattening food and it is often hard to resist that huge piece of pumpkin pie; at the end of the day you find you are letting out your pants a bit.

Trying to stay in shape for the pageant takes a lot of will power and trying to maintain a healthy diet and exercise plan around Thanksgiving can be very difficult. Instead of cutting yourself off from all delicious foods and being miserable throughout the holidays, try out these tips to get the most out of your Thanksgiving.

3 things to avoid:

  1. Make sure to eat breakfast on Thanksgiving. Many of us are tempted to “save up” our hunger for the big feast so we can fill up on turkey and mashed potatoes. However, eating earlier in the day will help you avoid consuming an overwhelming amount of calories during the Thanksgiving meal.
  2.  Drink water instead of punch or another drink. This is a great way to cut out empty, unnecessary calories. But if you are just in love with the special drink your grandma makes then have a small glass and count that as a treat.
  3. Don’t nibble at little things because you will lose track of how much you are actually eating. Make yourself a plate of food, eat it slowly, then sit for about twenty minutes before going up to get seconds so you can tell how full you really are.

3 things to do:

  1. Cut yourself some slack! Eat healthy the weeks leading up to Thanksgiving, so you have a little freedom with what you get to eat on the actual holiday.
  2. Try cutting down on the super fatty parts of the meal (gravy, butter, pies, cream) and load up on veggies, turkey, and fruit.
  3. Choose your desert wisely. Instead of taking 4 pieces of pie and scarfing them down, choose one small piece and savor it, really enjoy it. Try pumpkin pie instead of the chocolate cream, it is lower in calories and has many nutritional benefits!

Remember that balance is the key to being healthy in most things, so enjoy the holiday! Just remember the holiDAY is not all week. Get back on your healthy eating plan and keep your goal of general wellness–and performing well at your pageant–in the front of your mind. That makes it easier to make good choices day in and day out.


Healthy Weight Loss Tips for Pageant Girls

Trying to lose those stubborn pounds before a pageant can be very stressful. Remember, you are beautiful already so do not over-worry this!  But if it is indeed part of your plan then realize that there are countless ways to do it, many of which are hazardous–which is why many professionals suggest reaching your target weight about a month before the pageant to avoid any dangerous diets.

However, if you find yourself a few pounds shy of your goal days before the pageant then here are a few suggestions for healthy weight loss. And we do want healthy pageant contestants! :-)

–       If your sweet tooth starts kicking in, try munching on some dark chocolate instead of reaching for the cookie or bowel of ice cream.

–       Get a vegetable in at every meal— they fill you up before you can chow down on high calorie foods. They are low in calories, high in volume, and high in critically important nutrients–need I say more?

–       Eat breakfast everyday. A healthy breakfast jump starts your metabolism and helps raise you energy level for the rest of the day. It also helps you feel more satisfied throughout the day, preventing over eating or binge eating.

–       Portion control. I cannot stress this enough. Eat all the low-starch veggies you want! But other than that even too much healthy food can hinder weight loss; it’s not just the junk food.  You not only have to watch what you eat, but how much as well.

–       Eliminate all drinks other than water and herbal tea: many drinks such as soda, juice, alcohol, and other processed drinks are full of empty calories with no nutritional value.

–       When you feel a hunger pang, before reaching for that snack try drinking a big glass of water—you might be dehydrated.  Either way, water is also a must have to flush out all the toxins that may be inhibiting your weight loss. Drinking water is an easy way to stop yourself from binge or stress eating.

Remember that every one is different–use your head and avoid foods that you are allergic to or are otherwise intolerant of. For instance, some foods might make you bloat a little, or a lot!, so learn to listen to your body and avoid what it doesn’t like.

And no matter what, stay hydrated and get enough protein often enough in the day. It won’t help you out at all if you are feeling dizzy or weak ever, let alone during the extra demanding schedule at the pageant.  Be healthy!


Being Healthy & Looking Lovely: Upcoming Tips for Your Pageant Interview

Hello Pageant Contestants,

If you are like me, your life may seem like it is just getting busier. As you are preparing for you pageant it can feel even more that way!

Remember, when you are feeling busy it is okay to say “no” to some things. It is okay to say
“maybe” or  “later” too, depending on the situation. Once in awhile we have to let things go, or just accept not everything will be perfect but “go for it” anyway and have fun!  Sometimes it helps to take stock and sort out where you can use more support and then ask for help.

For me, it can be a challenge to keep up with writing–I have so much I’d like to share, but so little time. So I’ve sought out support to help with this blog. I’ll still join the mix now and then to share insights on how to prepare for interview effectively and how handle pageant interview questions like a pro, but I’m adding some folks to the team to contribute more regularly to help you in related areas.

Thus, in the coming days we’ll have a team member begin writing about beauty and fashion to give you ideas and resources. Her tips and tricks will inspire and educate. They’ll likely also save you time (and maybe some money). They certainly will help you look your best at your pageant interview, and at all other times!

Another team member will write about staying healthy as you seek your goals. A healthy body and a happy mind are more important than any crown. And you can have all three if you approach your pageant preparation with healthy attitudes about self, beauty, food, and fitness. There are certainly differing perspectives and lots of info out there (and you should always check with your physician if you feel poorly or before any serious dieting, of course), but hopefully the tips pulled together here will help remind you of some simple, healthy, and reasonable ways to approach finding balance in this arena.

So bookmark this page or sign up for the RSS feed and see how things unfold. :-)


What Do You Do for Your Community? Approaches to Pageant Interview Questions When Perhaps You Haven’t Done Much (or Lately)

As an Arizona resident, I find myself feeling sad and more serious this week due to the recent death of 19 firefighters from Prescott Arizona who lost their lives fighting one of the awful wildfires. Does it take 19 firefighters dying in one fell swoop for us to stop and appreciate what we have? To stop and think about how others help protect our lives, property, and ways of living? To stop and think how we contribute to (or detract from) our communities?

As a pageant contestant, your success with pageant interview questions will be enhanced if you operate from a position of gratitude and awareness. Most pageant titles include a locale—they are attached to a place. So ask yourself, “What do I know about that place?” and “What do I do for my community?”

What if a judge asked you that “What do you do for your community” question?  Or maybe not a judge, but let’s say you win your crown and someone from the media or an audience member at a public appearance asks you something like that? How would you reply?

Surely most pageant contestants already have this covered as most of you are involved in many exciting ways and/or your pageant requires a platform that has you thinking about such things.

But your pageant may not require community service, you may not need a platform, and volunteering just may not be your thing. If that’s the case, I’m certainly not suggesting that you need to make as big a contribution as the police and firefighters who put their lives on the line for us so often.

But I am suggesting that you start thinking about your role in the grander scheme of things. Start with simply thinking through “What kind of citizen am I? What kind of neighbor?”

Not all of us have the interest, time, talent, or skills to be a firefighter, police officer, paramedic, or military service person. But how often do we pause in the busy-ness of our days, our lives to be grateful for what these folks—and countless other public service people from trash collectors, to mail carriers, to traffic light engineers—do for us? Being a good neighbor, a good citizen starts with doing our small part to help the other people who have made a career out of serving the public. What can we do to help make their jobs easier? Complying with rules and requests (or using proper channels to politely challenge them) is the right thing to do and it helps keep the world we love safer, cleaner, and more functional.

But if you are in a pageant, saying “I obey traffic laws, follow the recycling guidelines to the letter, and am careful about campfires and stray matches” may not sound like “enough” or the right kind of answer to give if anyone ever asks you a “What do you do for your community?” kind of question.

It depends on how you handle it, the context (what other kinds of questions have you been asked, etc.), and remember to listen for the question “behind” the question. That is, often when you get a pageant interview question like this it could be because someone is trying to sort out if you are just about evening gowns and pageant dresses, shoes,

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Rewind: Answer the Question, Learning from Miss Utah USA

Thank you Marissa Powell for the courage and accomplishments that brought you to wearing the crown for Miss Utah USA. You had one rough patch last night at the Miss USA pageant with your final interview question, but you still rock and a bright future awaits.

Thank you, too, for the opportunity that rough patch gives the rest of us to self-assess and grow. If you ever read this, please know that this analysis using your pageant interview question and answer situation is well-intended for a larger good, even if it might accidentally hurt you a little. I’m sure you will be resilient to all this attention you are getting and make the most of it.

In a previous post today (called Should Pageant Interview Questions be Easier? No) I started to mention how important it is to listen well to get to the core of the question. When we listen well, we are in a better position to make choices about how to answer. This is something you definitely can learn to do every day and under pressure too! Let’s rewind last night and see what we can learn.

Here’s the pageant interview question Miss Marissa got: “A recent report shows that in 40% of American families with children women are the primary earners but women continue to earn less than men. What does this say about society?”

Let’s start with the components of the question:

– Size of the statistic (40%)
– Families or heads-of-household (not single people)
– Gender gap (men usually earn more)
– “Society”

Tip: If Miss Utah had picked any one of those key components and actually started her answer with a reference to that component, rather than to the non-present “education”, she’d have started off on a stronger foot. She would have

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Should Pageant Interview Questions Be Easier? No.

I saw it suggested on Twitter last night after the Miss USA pageant that on-stage pageant interview questions should be more “direct” because the girls are under pressure  and can’t “absorb anything” when faced with the big crowds, the excitement, and the lights in their eyes. I couldn’t disagree more.

And this is worrisome because the suggestion came from a group of women who care deeply about pageantry and contestants. In fact, they posted it be supportive but, oddly, it had the side effect of accidentally putting down pageant girls (in my opinion). To be clear, this came up around the Miss Utah USA answer that was, let’s admit it, far from ideal.

Let me say first, then, that I hold the gorgeous Marissa Powell in high regard and we all should. One bad answer doesn’t mean she’s not a smart and capable woman. That answer very likely cost her the crown, yes, but she might have just had a crazy wave of nerves hit her and we can appreciate that. It could happen to any of us.

But I think that’s where our offering reasons, or making excuses, for her should end. And I certainly don’t think it means pageants should ask simpler questions.

Why?  Keep in mind a few things:

  • Get Real. Most pageant contestants already have or want careers that involve excitement, bright lights, and crowds so they’d darn sure better get used to “absorbing” information and thinking on their feet in those situations. The skills we learn and practice in pageants transcend to all areas of life.
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Not All Beauty Pageants Are Alike—Find the Ones That Fit Best for You

It’s easy to look at a stage full of tall, slender beauty pageant contestants and wonder how you’d measure up. Or you might think that the fun of pageant experience isn’t available to you because you don’t look like them.

While some semblance of beauty is, as you’d guess, a typical feature of a successful beauty pageant contestant, it’s important to remember that there are many forms of beauty. That can be easy to forget if you limit your thinking to just the biggest, televised, or most well-known pageants.

Don’t be like those outside the pageant world, who often think all pageants are the same. Those are the same folks who innocently confuse Miss America with Miss USA, etc. Think broader and research different pageants to find the best fit for you.

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How Should a Beauty Pageant Contestant Handle Conflict? In Regard to the ex-Miss Pennsylvania vs. Mr. Trump’s Miss USA

The 2012 Miss USA pageant was televised earlier this week. The lovely Miss Rhode Island, Olivia Culpo, won the crown. She was thoughtful in her on-stage answer, she was beautiful, and she had a spontaneous, sparkly quality way about her.

But the now ex-Miss Pennsylvania, Sheena Monnin, apparently couldn’t see that. (Click here for a news article on the matter.) Instead of crediting that Miss Rhode Island could have actually earned the crown, she complained the pageant was fixed. She’s under the impression that somehow the winner, or at least the finalists, were determined before the pageant.

If indeed she believes that then one must applaud her integrity for raising the question.

But, on the on the other hand, one must wonder if it is sour grapes—if after all her own efforts she just couldn’t cope well with the fact that she didn’t make it even as far as the semi-finals. Just making it to Miss USA is a huge accomplishment, but some folks can’t accept that as “enough.”

Or we could wonder if she saw this as an opportunity to get her own 15 minutes of fame.

Or, to be fair, maybe she just showed bad judgment in how she approached what she felt was a real problem.

We can learn from anything that happens. So here are some things to think about as we consider pageants, pageant criticisms, and ourselves.

  • Should we look for trouble?  Should we listen to gossip? 
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Bouncing Back from Life and Pageant Problems

Whether it is in pageants or in life, sometimes things don’t go as we planned. Take me, for instance. My plan was to blog at least once a week. But shortly after I began, some sort of crazy attack happened at my web-hosting company and my site, and 100s or 1000s of others, went all wonky.

Has anything gone wonky for you?

Did you set out to get pageant fabulous and something didn’t go right? Maybe you started a fitness program and then suffered an injury that set you back. Maybe you started to get involved in developing your pageant platform just to have something change at work, home, or school that took all your time.

How did you respond to the set back?  Did you handle it like a queen?

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Child Beauty Pageants — Pageant mom right and wrongs, Part II

Greetings Pageant Fans!

Later this week, or early next, I’ll post on more interview-related topics…but there’s still more for us to think about in regard to that link I posted yesterday on the pageant mom who enters her daughters in many pageants to toughen them up.  

If you care about pageants, then you probably care about the well-being and reputation of pageants, pageant directors, pageant judges, and pageant contestants up and down the age scale. Maybe this journalist chose to focus on some things more than others, but, either way, it’s still worth considering what we think this pageant mom did/does “right” and “wrong”. Remember, we use this article just as an example, not to make her right or wrong, per se, as only she knows her own family.  Based on this article, however, here are more of my thoughts.

Right: Letting the girls compete if they want to do so. Wrong: Insisting they compete against each other. Especially if “goading” and “lashing out” is involved too often.   It’d be healthier for them to compete in different pageants. 

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