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Pageat Interview Queen


Rewind: Answer the Question, Learning from Miss Utah USA

Thank you Marissa Powell for the courage and accomplishments that brought you to wearing the crown for Miss Utah USA. You had one rough patch last night at the Miss USA pageant with your final interview question, but you still rock and a bright future awaits.

Thank you, too, for the opportunity that rough patch gives the rest of us to self-assess and grow. If you ever read this, please know that this analysis using your pageant interview question and answer situation is well-intended for a larger good, even if it might accidentally hurt you a little. I’m sure you will be resilient to all this attention you are getting and make the most of it.

In a previous post today (called Should Pageant Interview Questions be Easier? No) I started to mention how important it is to listen well to get to the core of the question. When we listen well, we are in a better position to make choices about how to answer. This is something you definitely can learn to do every day and under pressure too! Let’s rewind last night and see what we can learn.

Here’s the pageant interview question Miss Marissa got: “A recent report shows that in 40% of American families with children women are the primary earners but women continue to earn less than men. What does this say about society?”

Let’s start with the components of the question:

– Size of the statistic (40%)
– Families or heads-of-household (not single people)
– Gender gap (men usually earn more)
– “Society”

Tip: If Miss Utah had picked any one of those key components and actually started her answer with a reference to that component, rather than to the non-present “education”, she’d have started off on a stronger foot. She would have

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Not All Beauty Pageants Are Alike—Find the Ones That Fit Best for You

It’s easy to look at a stage full of tall, slender beauty pageant contestants and wonder how you’d measure up. Or you might think that the fun of pageant experience isn’t available to you because you don’t look like them.

While some semblance of beauty is, as you’d guess, a typical feature of a successful beauty pageant contestant, it’s important to remember that there are many forms of beauty. That can be easy to forget if you limit your thinking to just the biggest, televised, or most well-known pageants.

Don’t be like those outside the pageant world, who often think all pageants are the same. Those are the same folks who innocently confuse Miss America with Miss USA, etc. Think broader and research different pageants to find the best fit for you.

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How Should a Beauty Pageant Contestant Handle Conflict? In Regard to the ex-Miss Pennsylvania vs. Mr. Trump’s Miss USA

The 2012 Miss USA pageant was televised earlier this week. The lovely Miss Rhode Island, Olivia Culpo, won the crown. She was thoughtful in her on-stage answer, she was beautiful, and she had a spontaneous, sparkly quality way about her.

But the now ex-Miss Pennsylvania, Sheena Monnin, apparently couldn’t see that. (Click here for a news article on the matter.) Instead of crediting that Miss Rhode Island could have actually earned the crown, she complained the pageant was fixed. She’s under the impression that somehow the winner, or at least the finalists, were determined before the pageant.

If indeed she believes that then one must applaud her integrity for raising the question.

But, on the on the other hand, one must wonder if it is sour grapes—if after all her own efforts she just couldn’t cope well with the fact that she didn’t make it even as far as the semi-finals. Just making it to Miss USA is a huge accomplishment, but some folks can’t accept that as “enough.”

Or we could wonder if she saw this as an opportunity to get her own 15 minutes of fame.

Or, to be fair, maybe she just showed bad judgment in how she approached what she felt was a real problem.

We can learn from anything that happens. So here are some things to think about as we consider pageants, pageant criticisms, and ourselves.

  • Should we look for trouble?  Should we listen to gossip? 
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More than Just A Pretty Face: The Brains Behind the Pageants

Hi All,

I just ran across an article by Cheyenne Haslett that is titled the same as I titled this post, above. Check it out. (When you are done reading this, that is.) We need more articles like this to help folks appreciate that beauty pageants and scholarship competitions are about more than glamour and beauty.

One of the contestants in the linked article commented that she finds it “offensive when people think pageantry is just about beauty”.  Well, I’d say I find it “unfortunate” and that it more reflects their lack of knowledge than an intention to be offensive.  People can’t know what they don’t seek out or are not told. We in the pageant world need to help educate people (including media people) about the positive side of pageantry, as the linked article does.

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Why “Pageant To PhD”? Why the interviewing focus?

Welcome to Pageant To PhD’s “Pageant Interview Queen” blog!

Here we will explore various aspects of pageantry, but with an emphasis on interviewing. Why? While all the components of pageantry can help you be a more confident and successful person, it is the interview that has the most potential.

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